> Back to seminars list

Seminar

Friday, December 14th, 2018
11h
Centre de Recherche - Paris - Amphith√©√Ętre Constant-Burg - 12 rue Lhomond, Paris 5e

The role of CD2AP in myeloid cells

We originally cloned CD2AP as an adaptor protein involved in immunological synapse formation in T lymphocytes.  However, the CD2AP knockout mouse, dies of nephrotic syndrome (kidney) and mutations in CD2AP are a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.  In addition, CD2AP is most highly expressed in myeloid cells. Our work over the last 20 years has focused on understanding the cell biological function of CD2AP focused on the role of CD2AP in regulating the actin cytoskeleton, its role in vesicular recycling and its role in controlling cell movement.

 

Speaker(s)

Andrey Shaw
Staff Scientist

Immunology-Oncology Department, Genentech (USA)

Invited by

Claire Hivroz
Domain 3 - U932 - Immunity and Cancer

Institut Curie

Ana-Maria Lennon
Domain 3 - U932 - Immunity and Cancer

Institut Curie

Contact

Claire Hivroz

Institut Curie

Ana-Maria Lennon

Institut Curie

Learn more

For 25 years, the major focus of my laboratory has been in signal transduction mechanisms with a major interest in protein kinases and pseudokinases. About 10% of the kinome are pseudokinases and we hypothesize that both pseudokinases and kinases have important non-catalytic functions. We hope that understanding the non-catalytic function of kinases and pseudokinases will lead to a better understanding of how they function and lead to insights into strategies to inhibit their function. We use a variety of tools including biochemistry, structural biology and mouse models to address these issues.

A second area of interest is using new imaging methods to visualize signaling processes in immune cells. Signal transduction is mainly studied biochemically as the average of thousands or millions of cells. We hope to interrogate signaling at the single cell level in vivo by developing mouse models that incorporate biosensors that would allow us to detect activation of multiple signaling events using state of the art, imaging techniques.

Lastly, because of a serendipitous finding in a knockout mouse, we have also had a serious interest in the molecular basis of chronic kidney diseases, a major unmet medical need. The ability to develop new treatments that ameliorate or attenuate kidney failure will require a better understanding of why and how kidneys fail. Our ideas include identifying genetic, environmental and cell biological triggers for cell death and injury in the kidney and developing methods/biomarkers for assessing kidney health and disease.